Teams Of 3, Let Them Be

Aug 10th, 2013

Category: Competitor

Teams Of 3, Let Them Be

Games WOD

Games WOD

WARM UP
Grab a partner, grab a heavy keg/sandbag – move it 400m – one person carries at a time – switch where necessary.

Suggested weights
Games (110/80)
Regional (95/60)
Open (75/45)

WOD
As a team of 3 complete the following reps for time:
50 Deadlifts (280,185)
60 Chest to Bar Pull-ups
70 Cleans (190,135)
80 Pull-ups
90 Snatches (140,85)
100 Toes to Bar

Regional (260,165) (170,115), (120,75)
Open (240,145),(150,105),(100,65)

CA$H OUT
Zig Zag Sprint

DISCUSSION 6 Comments

  1. M.Rod 08/10/2013 at 2:05 pm

    Partnered up with sergio and andrew 28:40 open..great job guys

  2. M.Rod 08/10/2013 at 2:05 pm

    Partnered up with sergio and andrew 28:40 open..great job guys

  3. Mattw 08/10/2013 at 3:09 am

    Timing
    By Donny Shankle

    I will always remember the first time I clean and jerked 195 kilos because it was so easy. To this day it stands out in my head more than any other lift I have ever done. One evening at the Wichita Falls Athletic Club, with only one other weightlifter in the room, I put 195 kilos on the bar after a previous successful personal record lift at 190 kilos. My best lift before this point was 187.5 kilos and my improvement had been slow getting there. In this one evening I improved my C&J by 7.5 kilos and felt for the first time something called oscillation.

    I get emailed a lot from lifters concerned about why their clean and jerk is lagging behind their snatch in terms of initial progress. There are two reasons for this. First, the snatch is just an awkward exercise because no one lifts things over their heads using such a wide grip. With practice you begin to see how remarkable the human animal is at adapting to change. In fact, the human nervous system is more durable than the nervous system of any other animal. The shoulders and traps respond quickly to stress and eventually your snatch steadily improves for a beginning weightlifter on a weekly basis. Secondly, the C&J requires a greater amount of strength in the legs, hips, and back which just takes a much longer time to develop. The clean and jerk, you must also remember, is made up of two different exercises whereas the snatch is one exercise. Both of these exercises require a greater amount of skill than the snatch and this means a greater amount of time is required to develop this strength and skill. Then you have to learn how to put them together. Let us get back to the greater amount of strength necessary for the C&J.

    The stronger your body becomes the better it is at holding positions and this shifts to more power put into the bar. For example, the stronger a weightlifters back is the longer he will be able to keep his hips back during the pull. Once he opens up you see the weightlifters great concentric strength which is improved by repetition and moving fast. Concentric strength is also greatly improved by practicing eccentric lowering in your training. This eccentric lowering or “negatives” also make you very strong overall. Very little on the other hand is mentioned about a weightlifters isometric strength and this has always puzzled me. It is your isometric strength which allows oscillation (the bending of the bar) to take place. Without holding the body vertical, and keeping it that way, you will not feel the whip on the bar standing up from a clean or dipping for the jerk. Without the use of this whip the lift will be much slower and more difficult to complete at heavy weights. Learning how to feel and react at the right time to bar oscillation takes an incredible amount of eccentric, concentric, and isometric strength. It also takes an understanding of timing this bar bend and dovetailing it to your trained reaction to the bar which is a skill acquired through practice. When timed right, on an isometrically strong torso, this oscillation will in fact help to pull you out of your clean and snap the bar up easily on your jerk. Without mastering timing oscillation you will never C&J very big weights. So if you are training to be a weightlifter you have to learn this. If you are just lifting weights to improve another discipline where you do not have to go as heavy then learning perfect timing is not as big a deal.

    Response to oscillation is all about timing and strength and when you time a lift right it can be overwhelming. You begin to tell yourself in training, “Did that just happen? Did I really just do that that easy?” When I hit 195 kilos for the first time I said the same thing to myself. At that moment I knew bigger weights were in sight if I continued to practice this correct timing until I perfected it. This is tough to do because the bar bend changes at every increase in weight and not every bar is the same. Eleiko bars, Uesaka bars, Pendlay bars etc. all spring differently and a great weightlifter prepares on the same bar in his training that he will be using in competition. He does this to eliminate any bit of change on competition day. Timing oscillation can also change depending on how you load your plates and whether or not you are using collars. Weights in competition are always loaded heaviest to lightest and in training this should be the same unless you are working on perfecting oscillation using lighter weights. One day you might hit an easy 160 kilo c&j and next week it may feel completely different and a bit harder. Was the bar loaded the same? Did you have the reds on the outside last week? If you did then you unknowingly increased bar bend by loading heavier weights to the outside. Also, a bar without collars will not whip the same as a bar with collars so pay attention to this as well.

    Timing a lift perfectly is the last skill you learn if you start weightlifting already very strong usually a few years after puberty. It is the first thing you learn if you begin weightlifting very young and this is the main reason why a person who starts young has such a big advantage. His ability to time oscillation allows him to not just muscle the bar into position with his strength. Instead, he combines the strength he has with moving the bar beautifully. He has learned early on how to time his finish so that he moves under the bar with the greatest speed possible after he has reached full extension. He has learned when to precisely move under a snatch. He has learned when to drive out of his dip on the jerk, or how to feel bar bend and when to respond to that at the bottom of a clean. The weightlifter who starts his training at an older age relies much more on using only his strength and this can be a tough habit to break. The best weightlifters in history were both very strong and lifted efficiently. Through adaptation their timing improved with each weight lifted. Timing a very heavy lift perfectly just takes time and even the best screw up sometimes.

  4. Mattw 08/10/2013 at 3:09 am

    Timing
    By Donny Shankle

    I will always remember the first time I clean and jerked 195 kilos because it was so easy. To this day it stands out in my head more than any other lift I have ever done. One evening at the Wichita Falls Athletic Club, with only one other weightlifter in the room, I put 195 kilos on the bar after a previous successful personal record lift at 190 kilos. My best lift before this point was 187.5 kilos and my improvement had been slow getting there. In this one evening I improved my C&J by 7.5 kilos and felt for the first time something called oscillation.

    I get emailed a lot from lifters concerned about why their clean and jerk is lagging behind their snatch in terms of initial progress. There are two reasons for this. First, the snatch is just an awkward exercise because no one lifts things over their heads using such a wide grip. With practice you begin to see how remarkable the human animal is at adapting to change. In fact, the human nervous system is more durable than the nervous system of any other animal. The shoulders and traps respond quickly to stress and eventually your snatch steadily improves for a beginning weightlifter on a weekly basis. Secondly, the C&J requires a greater amount of strength in the legs, hips, and back which just takes a much longer time to develop. The clean and jerk, you must also remember, is made up of two different exercises whereas the snatch is one exercise. Both of these exercises require a greater amount of skill than the snatch and this means a greater amount of time is required to develop this strength and skill. Then you have to learn how to put them together. Let us get back to the greater amount of strength necessary for the C&J.

    The stronger your body becomes the better it is at holding positions and this shifts to more power put into the bar. For example, the stronger a weightlifters back is the longer he will be able to keep his hips back during the pull. Once he opens up you see the weightlifters great concentric strength which is improved by repetition and moving fast. Concentric strength is also greatly improved by practicing eccentric lowering in your training. This eccentric lowering or “negatives” also make you very strong overall. Very little on the other hand is mentioned about a weightlifters isometric strength and this has always puzzled me. It is your isometric strength which allows oscillation (the bending of the bar) to take place. Without holding the body vertical, and keeping it that way, you will not feel the whip on the bar standing up from a clean or dipping for the jerk. Without the use of this whip the lift will be much slower and more difficult to complete at heavy weights. Learning how to feel and react at the right time to bar oscillation takes an incredible amount of eccentric, concentric, and isometric strength. It also takes an understanding of timing this bar bend and dovetailing it to your trained reaction to the bar which is a skill acquired through practice. When timed right, on an isometrically strong torso, this oscillation will in fact help to pull you out of your clean and snap the bar up easily on your jerk. Without mastering timing oscillation you will never C&J very big weights. So if you are training to be a weightlifter you have to learn this. If you are just lifting weights to improve another discipline where you do not have to go as heavy then learning perfect timing is not as big a deal.

    Response to oscillation is all about timing and strength and when you time a lift right it can be overwhelming. You begin to tell yourself in training, “Did that just happen? Did I really just do that that easy?” When I hit 195 kilos for the first time I said the same thing to myself. At that moment I knew bigger weights were in sight if I continued to practice this correct timing until I perfected it. This is tough to do because the bar bend changes at every increase in weight and not every bar is the same. Eleiko bars, Uesaka bars, Pendlay bars etc. all spring differently and a great weightlifter prepares on the same bar in his training that he will be using in competition. He does this to eliminate any bit of change on competition day. Timing oscillation can also change depending on how you load your plates and whether or not you are using collars. Weights in competition are always loaded heaviest to lightest and in training this should be the same unless you are working on perfecting oscillation using lighter weights. One day you might hit an easy 160 kilo c&j and next week it may feel completely different and a bit harder. Was the bar loaded the same? Did you have the reds on the outside last week? If you did then you unknowingly increased bar bend by loading heavier weights to the outside. Also, a bar without collars will not whip the same as a bar with collars so pay attention to this as well.

    Timing a lift perfectly is the last skill you learn if you start weightlifting already very strong usually a few years after puberty. It is the first thing you learn if you begin weightlifting very young and this is the main reason why a person who starts young has such a big advantage. His ability to time oscillation allows him to not just muscle the bar into position with his strength. Instead, he combines the strength he has with moving the bar beautifully. He has learned early on how to time his finish so that he moves under the bar with the greatest speed possible after he has reached full extension. He has learned when to precisely move under a snatch. He has learned when to drive out of his dip on the jerk, or how to feel bar bend and when to respond to that at the bottom of a clean. The weightlifter who starts his training at an older age relies much more on using only his strength and this can be a tough habit to break. The best weightlifters in history were both very strong and lifted efficiently. Through adaptation their timing improved with each weight lifted. Timing a very heavy lift perfectly just takes time and even the best screw up sometimes.