Sunday FloatFest

Jul 28th, 2013

Category: Competitor

Sunday FloatFest

Conditioning Floater?

Conditioning Floater?

Floaters

Weightlifting
“The Bear”
5 sets of the sequence:
7 rounds of:
1 power clean
1 front squat
1 push press
1 back squat
1 push press
Rest between sets as needed. Goal is max load in a set. No changing loading during a set

Gymnastics
EMOM 10
1 Muscle-up
1 Rope Climb
**Add weight vest

Conditioning
2x Through
Row 1000m
Rest 3 minutes
Run 800m
Rest 3 minutes

DISCUSSION 2 Comments

  1. mattw 07/28/2013 at 4:00 pm

    Cant get enough of this guy. This is a snippet from his blog post on Friday. Again, sht gets me fired up to change where i am mentally in the box to get better…. Happy Sunday btoast.

    Applied Together

    Power
    By Donny Shankle
    7/26

    Violent Power

    The biggest difference I see between an experienced weightlifter and someone just starting out lifting weights is the amount of noticeable power put into the bar by the former. You can actually hear the hips coming through, the feet moving with authority, and the rattling of the bar. The overall presence of the weightlifter is intimidating as he approaches the bar and as he lifts you can feel his power sweep through you. The weightlifter is being aggressive and is focused only on moving violently. He is confident in his technique because he has put in many hours refining it. The beginner has not developed this violent power yet because it is something which needs to be trained and his focus is still on learning.

    The phrase “move violently” was explained to me by coach Pendlay while I was training under uncle Abadjiev. It is the best example to explain how to attack the bar, and you have to move violently if you want to lift as much weight as you possibly can. If you were to look at the journal I kept while training under uncle you might think you were in a scene from The Shining. There are pages upon pages of me writing to myself, “Move Donny! Move Violently!” The point being the circumstance I was in required me to tap into something more than perfection of form. I needed to get pissed and channel that energy into the bar. I needed to move violently if I was going to make it through the training. All thoughts on technique and none on moving violently makes Jack a slow boy.

    During the 2006 worlds I warmed up across from Dmitry Lapikov. In between his lifts he would spit, cuss, and mean mug the bar. I asked later what he was actually saying in russian. “I hate the bar! The bar is my enemy! It has taken everything from me!”, is what was translated to me. This lifter understood quite well that in order to lift the most that day he needed to psyche himself up and move violently. Moving this way is trained, but it is also more of a deliberate action. Every repetition you do go after it like you mean it and never expect the bar to just get up over your head on its own accord. You have to apply that violence into the lift. No one else will do it for you.

  2. mattw 07/28/2013 at 4:00 pm

    Cant get enough of this guy. This is a snippet from his blog post on Friday. Again, sht gets me fired up to change where i am mentally in the box to get better…. Happy Sunday btoast.

    Applied Together

    Power
    By Donny Shankle
    7/26

    Violent Power

    The biggest difference I see between an experienced weightlifter and someone just starting out lifting weights is the amount of noticeable power put into the bar by the former. You can actually hear the hips coming through, the feet moving with authority, and the rattling of the bar. The overall presence of the weightlifter is intimidating as he approaches the bar and as he lifts you can feel his power sweep through you. The weightlifter is being aggressive and is focused only on moving violently. He is confident in his technique because he has put in many hours refining it. The beginner has not developed this violent power yet because it is something which needs to be trained and his focus is still on learning.

    The phrase “move violently” was explained to me by coach Pendlay while I was training under uncle Abadjiev. It is the best example to explain how to attack the bar, and you have to move violently if you want to lift as much weight as you possibly can. If you were to look at the journal I kept while training under uncle you might think you were in a scene from The Shining. There are pages upon pages of me writing to myself, “Move Donny! Move Violently!” The point being the circumstance I was in required me to tap into something more than perfection of form. I needed to get pissed and channel that energy into the bar. I needed to move violently if I was going to make it through the training. All thoughts on technique and none on moving violently makes Jack a slow boy.

    During the 2006 worlds I warmed up across from Dmitry Lapikov. In between his lifts he would spit, cuss, and mean mug the bar. I asked later what he was actually saying in russian. “I hate the bar! The bar is my enemy! It has taken everything from me!”, is what was translated to me. This lifter understood quite well that in order to lift the most that day he needed to psyche himself up and move violently. Moving this way is trained, but it is also more of a deliberate action. Every repetition you do go after it like you mean it and never expect the bar to just get up over your head on its own accord. You have to apply that violence into the lift. No one else will do it for you.